Models for Success in Expanding Participation 

 Breakfast in the Classroom 

All children are offered breakfast in their classroom, either at the beginning of the school day, or early in the day. Learn more from this infographic by FRAC and this information from Action for Healthy kids.

 Where it's Served:  Classroom (or Grab N Go in cafeteria taken to the classroom)

 When it's Served:  After the school day begins, immediately following the bell

 How it's Served:  Transported to and from the classroom by school nutrition staff and/or student volunteers

 Who it Works With:  Can work in any school setting (most commonly used in elementary schools)

 What the Research Says:  Success rates can be as high as 98% of school enrollment

 Breakfast After the Bell/Second Chance Breakfast 

 

Offers students a second chance to obtain and eat breakfast after homeroom or first period.

 

 Where it's Served:  Cafeteria, hallways

 When it's Served:  After the first period

 How it's Served:  Same as traditional Breakfast in the Cafeteria, Breakfast in the Classroom, or Grab N Go

 Who it Works With:  Can work in any school setting (most commonly used in secondary schools)

 What the Research Says:  Participation rate increases between 15% and 40%

Find more information the resources listed below:

How to start a breakfast after the bell program

Secondary school principals’ breakfast after the bell toolkit

Action for Healthy Kids Second Chance Breakfast

Implementing Breakfast after the Bell

 Grab N Go Breakfast 

Children can easily grab the components of their breakfast quickly from the cafeteria line or from carts or kiosks elsewhere on school grounds. Learn more from Action for Healthy Kids.

 Where it's Served:  Cafeteria, hallways, common areas (inside and outside building)

 When it's Served:  Before the school day begins or after first period (as part of a Nutrition Break)

 How it's Served:  Stations can be set up in a variety of locations in the cafeteria and other high traffic areas, such as hallways or entryways

 Who it Works With:  Can work in any school setting (works well in secondary schools and for students who can't come to school early enough to eat in the cafeteria)

 What the Research Says:  Participation rate increases between 15% and 40% in secondary schools

 Community Eligibility Program/Universal Breakfast 

 

No cost to students—Providing “universal” breakfast at no charge to all students helps erase the stigma associated with free breakfast, and streamlines the meal delivery process.

 

Find more information the resources listed below:

 

Offering Breakfast to All Students

USDA Community Eligibility Provision

FRAC Community Eligibility Provision

What does CEP mean for your school or local educational agency?

How the community eligibility provision can help